Virginie Foloppe

Male gaze

“Me Too is a movement, not a moment”. Tarana Burke.
In France, on November 3, 2019, Adèle Haenel spread the Me Too movement initiated by Tarana Burke in 2006, speaking publicly and live on mediapart to denounce the sexual assault of which she was a victim as a minor under 15 years old. My video, which is part of this movement carried above all by survivors, testifies to “une culture du viol à la française”, according to the title of the book by Valérie Rey-Robert present in the image. On February 28, 2020, I joined the demonstrators near the Salle Pleyel, the day of the Caesar ceremony where Polanski was named despite multiple accusations of rape. Then, on the evening of March 7, violently repressed by the police, where I surprised myself shouting with the demonstrators, as never before. And finally on July 10, Place de l’Hotel de Ville after having watched for a call, following the appointment of Darmanin (Prime Ministe accused of raper) and Dupont-Moretti (Minister of Justice ). The sounds that you will hear, I recorded them during these three dates. And, if a book is present in the image, it is because it is an intellectual stone capable of making the eye bleed, a weapon for collective resistance.

The videos of Virginie Foloppe, based in Paris, are short performances. Since 2019, social movements in France have become a great source of inspiration for her, the Yellow Vests, feminist gatherings and demonstrations, where the photographic medium or sound recording have been experimented, while continuing to conduct her research on sexual violence (rape and incest), in video, articles, creative writing, or in his course at the Sorbonne Nouvelle.

Daniela Lucato

My name is Sami

Cinematography: Jacopo Pantaleoni



This video was made during lockdown and finished on 25th April 2020. It is a reflection about domestic violence, human rights and woman condition in all countries. I was inspired by a personal involvement: an old friend I met by chance after a long time told me the abuse she was victim of from her husband. She thought it was painful but she accepted it as a normal condition. I was shocked and I told her she needed to contact the police. I thought about this short talk we had for a long time. I really think the way she accepted this abuse, thinking it was normal, is a huge issue for many women.

This is something that needs to be changed. This topic is for me really important and the work “My name is Sami” is a studio for a bigger project. I feel a responsibility as a woman artist to make people think about it, to confront themselves with this item. I don’t know if it will help to resolve the problem, but this is a start to fight it.

Daniela Lucato started playing theatre in Padua (Italy) parallel to her studies at the university. After her degree in Philosophy she moved to Rome, Wellington and finally Berlin where she works as an actress/filmmaker. The Birthday (2014), her first short film written/directed in mandarin/english language, has been officially selected from 25 international festivals (among these Micgenero, Frameline, ShanghaiPride where the film was also nominated for the best cinematography). In 2015 she founded Connecting Fingers Company. Her last productions for theatre are Connecting Fingers, The Wheel, The rebellious Body. Her last films When I dance (2016), The Wheel (2017) are screen- ing on international film festivals. For the time being (2018) received the award as best in- ternational short film at DUAF/ Tribeca Film Center. In 2019 she wrote/directed the experimental short film Vieni and in (2020) the narrative short Mamma dorme (Mommy’s sleeping). During Covid-19 she wrote/performed/directed the short film My name is Sami.

Carolyn Guinzio

LONG WINTER

A sound and visual experiment about the “loss of power” in all senses. The sound is comprised entirely of altered, distorted, and slowed down household electronic sounds—the sounds of domesticity.

My piece “At Opening” appeared in A) Glimpse) Of), to my delight. My newest book (A) V(ertigo Book) won the Tenth Gate Poetry Prize and will appear later this year through The Word Works. My work has appeared in The Nation, The New Yorker, Poetry, and many other journals. My films have appeared in OzCast, Poetry Film Live, the Cadence Film Festival (Jury winner) and other venues and forums. My website is carolynguinzio.tumblr.com.

Stefana McClure

Poetry-wrapped protest stones, one for each pocket ready to be thrown.

 

No

 

No: a poem by Emily Dickinson, 2 poetry-wrapped stones, left stone: 12.5 x 12.5 x 7.5 cm, right stone: 10 x 12.5 x 5 cm, 2020.

Protest

Protest: a poem by Ella Wheeler Wilcox, 2 poetry-wrapped stones, left stone: 9 x 12.5 x 5 cm, right stone: 10 x 12.5 x 4 cm, 2020.

Riot

Riot: a poem by Gwendolyn Brooks, 2 poetry-wrapped stones, left stone: 10 x 12.5 x 7.5 cm, right stone: 7.5 x 12.5 x 7.5 cm, 2020

Born in Lisburn, Northern Ireland, in 1959, Stefana McClure received her BA from Hornsey College of Art in London and continued her studies at Kyoto Seika University in Japan. She lives and works in New York. Recent solo exhibitions have been held at Josée Bienvenu Gallery, New York (2018); Bartha Contemporary, London (2017); Sleeper, Edinburgh, Scotland (2017); and Arróniz Arte Contemporáneo, Mexico City (2015). McClure has been included in numerous museum exhibitions, most recently Useless: Art Machines for Dreaming, Thinking, and Seeing, curated by Gerardo Mosquera, at The Bronx Museum of the Arts, New York (2019). Her work is included in many public collections including: The Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY; Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University Art Museums, Cambridge, MA; The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, TX; The Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, CT; Staatsgalerie Stuttgart, Germany; Museum Folkwang, Essen, Germany; Kunstmuseum Bonn, Germany; and The Machida City International Print Museum, Tokyo, Japan.

Mez Breeze

A Place Called Ormalcy

“A Place Called Ormalcy” is a dystopian fiction comprised of seven short text Chapters combined with embedded 3D tableaus. The work is designed to be viewed on mobile devices and desktop PCs. The story of “A Place Called Ormalcy” unfolds through a series of snapshots of the life of Mr Ormal, a law-abiding citizen who resides in the aesthetically cartoonish world of Ormalcy: Ormalcy exists in an alternative universe complete with its own idiosyncratic language patterns. The world initially presents as Utopian, and full of innocent “claymationesque” contented creatures and happy denizens, but as the story creeps along it becomes apparent that in actuality, this allegorical fiction in fact traces the makings of a disruptive dystopic society, one where citizens are forced to comprehend what can happen when trapped inside their own homes for the sake of their ‘safety’. It illustrates how fascist principles can arise in the most benevolent of places – the story emphasis lies with how nefarious a process this is, and how this disrupts all.

«Ένα μέρος με το όνομα Ανονικότητα» είναι μια δυστοπική μυθοπλασία που αποτελείται από επτά σύντομα κεφάλαια στα οποία έχουν ενσωματωθεί τρισδιάστατα tableaus. Το έργο είναι σχεδιασμένο για φορητές συσκευές και ηλεκτρονικούς υπολογιστές. Στο «Ένα Μέρος με το όνομα Ανονικότητα», η ιστορία ξετυλίγεται μέσα από μια σειρά επεισοδίων στη ζωή του Κυρίου Ανονικού, ενός νομοταγή πολίτη που κατοικεί στον κόσμο της Ανονικότητας όπου όλα έχουν την αισθητική κινουμένων σχεδίων: η Ανονικότητα υπάρχει σαν ένα εναλλακτικό σύμπαν με τα δικά του ιδιοσυγκρασιακά μοτίβα γλώσσας. Ο κόσμος αρχικά μοιάζει Ουτοπικός, αλλά όπως ξετυλίγεται σταδιακά η ιστορία γίνεται σαφές ότι στην πραγματικότητα αυτή η αλληγορική μυθοπλασία ιχνηλατεί ουσιαστικά την κατασκευή μια παρεμβατικής ουτοπικής κοινωνίας, στην οποία οι πολίτες είναι υποχρεωμένοι να κατανοούν τι ενδέχεται να συμβεί αν παγιδευτούν μέσα στα ίδια τους τα σπίτια στο όνομα της «ασφάλειά» τους. Απεικονίζει τον τρόπο με τον οποίο οι φασιστικές αρχές μπορεί να αναδυθούν στα πιο καλοπροαίρετα μέρη – η ιστορία δίνει έμφαση στο πόσο φαύλη είναι αυτή η διαδικασία και πόσο αναχαιτίζει τα πάντα.
Μετάφραση: Δήμητρα Ιωάννου

Please, follow this link to watch “A Place Called Ormalcy:”

http://mezbreezedesign.com/vr-literature/a-place-called-ormalcy/

Mez first started deep diving into the Internet in the 1990’s to create digital works and she hasn’t slowed since. In 2019, Mez’s Virtual Reality Series V[R]ignettes won the 2019 QUT Digital Literature Award and Mez was awarded the 2019 Marjorie C. Luesebrink Award which: “…honors a visionary artist who has brought excellence to the field of electronic literature.”

Socrates Stamatatos

F*CK THIS COP(ING) MECHANISM

This performative collage/meme depicts the dysphoria that the police brutality creates in Greece. During the pandemic, the search for coping mechanisms in order to survive is desperate. While striving for emotional balance, the government pushes our limits further by strengthening the fear of existing in public spaces. To establish their fascist agenda, they conceal police brutality as their coping mechanism for COVID-19 outbreaks.

With the government monitoring our every move, the burden of creating safe spaces and healthy coping mechanisms becomes a personal matter. Being more than 5 months locked down, getting banned several times on social media, fearing a potential attack while collectively marching, builds a solitude chamber for each subject. The need for solidarity can’t be easily approached, or when it does, it comes with great cost, and gets stripped away eventually.

The Greek government not only vilified social media, by verbally attacking them and consistently banning people’s actions there, but they spent a significant amount of money on the Greek Media( ex. Major tv networks) to promote their agenda and far-right actions. As a result there are not many spaces left to exist, create, get informed, protest.

Being Queer in Greece and taking under consideration the massive attacks on several of our rights, the fear of being present in public places no longer seems like a dystopian nightmare. The nightmare transformed into reality with the collective memory notifying us that this common experience resembles a contemporary junta.
At the same time, the need for self care and coping with this junta keeps getting bigger every day. From a personal perspective, napping is the only outlet left as it creates an embracing and caring space, free from dysphoric thoughts and from being constantly bombarded with new unpleasant information.

Socrates Stamatatos is graduate from the Athens School of Fine Arts, Department of Theory and History of Arts with research focused on contemporary and queer arts. He has worked as an art mediator and assistant curator with many art organizations, such as the non-profit cultural organization NEON. He/She was also part of “FILOTIMO” a project commissioned by the Dutch based magazine “Are We Europe”. The project was nominated as a top recommendation by “The Guardian”. As a drag artist he/she has strong presence in the arts sector and has worked in many projects commissioned by various Greek cultural institutions, such as the Athens-Epidaurus Festival and the Greek Ministry of Arts,Culture and Sports to name a few.

Dimitra Ioannou

THE CITY IS NOW YOURS

The ongoing photo essay “Τhe City is Now Yours” is a kind of palimpsest: in each photo there are traces of another; the magnified surfaces of walls, pavements and signs found in the Athenian Zone are partly erased by portraits of women and feminist slogans or vice versa.

Dimitra Ioannou experiments with narrative or anti-narrative forms in various media (language, photography, publications). She has exhibited her (video)poems, and photos in solo or group shows in Greece. Her pamphlet Electric Sarcasm is out from Ugly Duckling Presse (2020). She is the editor of the journal A) GLIMPSE) OF).

Monica Kim

time at a cross-section

“time at a cross-section” features erasure poems of The New York Times articles from the 1910s-1960s, and erases, inserts, and blacks out words to reimagine narratives that aren’t misogynistic and transphobic. Some poems address gender identity and expression, while others contend with the pressures women face in literature; still others tackle the intersectionality of gender and race to comment on modern-day issues while appropriating older language.

Monica Kim is a social justice advocate and aspiring writer. Born in Seoul, South Korea, she has lived in New Jersey for most of her life. Her writing has been published in The Mantle, Okay Donkey, Thimble Magazine, Stirring, and The Michigan Quarterly Review Online.

J.I. Kleinberg

THE HORIZON

DRAFTS

THE ABUNDANT DARK

BRIDE

VIVID

J.I. Kleinberg’s visual poems have been published in print and online journals worldwide. An artist, poet, and freelance writer, she lives in Bellingham, Washington, USA, and on Instagram @jikleinberg.

Michelle Moloney King

5 miles of coloured pencils in mother’s hedgeschool

Michelle Moloney King, {she/her} neo-postmodern poet, asemic poet, & editor of Beir Bua Poetry Journal / Academic background ~ computer science, primary teaching & Hypnotherapy / Work published in Spillwords, streetcake, Artistic Differences Project, Babel Tower, & others / Holds Pushcart Nom  / Visual Artists Ireland member / 
Website ~ www.michellemoloneyking.wordpress.com  

Laura Hinton

is for Rapid City (or, Babysitter’s Husband)

The letter R is created by the artist Toni Simon.

Laura Hinton is a multi-media poet, literary critic, and editor as well as an educator. Her most recent poetry book is Ubermutter’s Death Dance (BlazeVox); she has staged this performance work in poetry venues from Tucson to Maine to New York City, where she lives and teaches. Critical books and edited collections include The Perverse Gaze of Sympathy: Sadomasochistic Sentiments from Clarissa to Rescue 911 (SUNY Press), We Who Love to Be Astonished: Experimental Women’s Writing and Performance Poetics (co-editor) and Jayne Cortez, Adrienne Rich, and the Feminist Superhero: Voice, Vision, Politics and Performance in the U.S. Contemporary Women’s Poetics (editor). She is a Professor at the City College of New York (CCNY of CUNY), where she teaches feminist and literary theory, poetics, film and visual studies, as well as creative writing. She is also the editor of the hybrid-poetics journal Chant de la Sirene (www.chantdelasirenejournal.com), and her website is at laurahinton-singingsirens.com.

Toni Simon is a multimedia artist and writer whose work encompasses the ways in which the future might appear, accessed through trance states. The process of channeled, automatic writing led to her illustrated book of experimental prose poetry Earth After Earth (Lunar Chandelier Press, 2012) and her current manuscript and video animation Telescope Highway. Her drawings have been exhibited at the Drawing Center, Odetta and A.I.R. Gallery in NYC.
 

Janelle Cordero

Janelle Cordero is an interdisciplinary artist and educator living in the
seventh most hipster city in the U.S. Her writing has been published in
dozens of literary journals, including Harpur Palate and The Louisville
Review, while her paintings have been featured in venues throughout the
Pacific Northwest. Janelle is the author of two books of poetry: Woke to
Birds
(V.A. Press, 2019) and Two Cups of Tomatoes (P.W.P. Press, 2015).
Her new book of poetry and artwork, Many Types of Wildflowers, is
forthcoming in December 2020 from V.A. Press. Stay connected with
Janelle’s work at www.janellecordero.com.

Madeline Cash

Sponge Cake

Your mom is birdwatching and you’re thinking about rapists. She points out a woodpecker or something. She use to be a big name in publishing. Now she’s retired. Now she makes sponge cake and points out woodpeckers. The walls are painted eggshell so she’s walking on eggshells as she’s climbing the walls. She has the best landscaper in Connecticut. You wonder if your mom has a rapist. She’d have the best rapist in Connecticut. Her trees are so lush that they’re top- heavy. Their trunks buckle under the weight of their foliage. It’s like their suicidal says your mom. The best landscaper in Connecticut bolsters them with structural reinforcements.


Your mom asks if you slept on the flight here and you tell her you don’t sleep. You try to shower but your mom’s faucet is in French. It says “chaud” and “froid”. It’s too froid. It isn’t froid enough. You think your mom could use a visit to Froid. She asks where your rapist is now and you say he’s in your pocket.


Your rapist is on instagram, hanging out with everyone. Everyone is like, so-and-so invited him. He use to be a big name in raping. Now he’s retired. Now he hangs out with so-and-so and this must have been some fluke thing because he’s a really nice guy if you get to know him everyone tells you. The trees are suicidal and it doesn’t matter what language the shower is in, you never feel clean anyway.


You have trouble breathing at night. Your mom asks where your rapist is now and you say he’s in your lungs. You go for a walk on eggshells. Your mom’s landscaper is the best in Connecticut. He waves you over to see where the trees are buckling. He tells you he got into the country in a shipping crate so small he had to dislocate his shoulder to fit inside. You tell him your rapist is on instagram, hanging out with everyone. He says sometimes life throws a lot at you.


Your mom has a hybrid dog. You scratch its belly and pick up its shit. Once it dislocated your mom’s shoulder by pulling too hard on the leash. She could have fit in a shipping crate, you think. The dog cocks its head at you. It tells you that it use to be a person, a person who threw a quarter in a well during a lightening storm and woke up in the body of a hybrid dog in Connecti- cut. Some fluke thing. You’re like why are you telling me this. He says sometimes life throws a lot at you. You ask what it’s like being a dog and he says it has its days.


Your mom is making sponge cake and you’re thinking about rapists. Yours is a really nice guy if you get to know him. Your mom use to work in Paris. Now it’s only Paris in her shower. Now she’s buckling but bolstered with structural reinforcements. Now she’s blanching the basil and deboning the branzino and she’s mastered the sponge cake which is very moist. Don’t patholo- gize the sponge cake says your mom. Eat up. Life is hard but not as hard as a stale sponge cake. She makes extra for the dog and the landscaper.

Madeline is a writer from Sarah Lawrence College living and working in Los Angeles.

THE NEST ISSUE

April-July 2020

In late March 2020, A) GLIMPSE) OF) made an open call asking writers, and artists:

What is your NEST during lockdown? If you feel like sharing your thoughts during this time, send along your collaborative poems, your monologues and drawings, your tears, your aargh!, your sleepless nights, your manifestos, your curses, and your sadness.

To my delight, a lot of fascinating responses came in. Poems, sound poems, photo collages, sound and prose pieces, visual and prose poems, conceptual photographs, and drawings depicting worries, memories, longings, and changing habits in those extraordinary times. Works were published gradually.

Many thanks to Clara Burghelea, John Morgan, Daniel Whelan, Caterina Stamou, Anatoly Kudryavitsky, Tracy Gaughan, Zoe Sklepa, Tony Iantosca, Amy McCauley, Smaragda Nitsopoulou, Thomas Osatchoff, Daphne Xanthopoulou, Richard LeDue, Kevin Canfield, Oz Hardwick, Babak Ahteshamipour, L Scully, Catherine Chatzidimitriou, Sara Rosenthal, Hunter Gagnon, Kiriakos Spirou, L Scully, Catherine Chatzidimitriou, Sara Rosenthal, Christina Alexiou, Robert Sheppard, Anthoula Lelekidis, Marie Hervé, Zebulon Huset, Jessica Tyson, Nolan Hutton, Daniel M. Shapiro, Sam Heaps, Linda Kemp, Erika Hodges, Aea Varfis-van Warmelo and Jeremy Allan Hawkins for sharing their works with us.

Hope you are keeping well.
Enjoy the issue!

Dimitra